The Midnight Library

by

What if you could enter a library that would allow you to re-live moments of your past? And what if you could live those choices you didn’t take and see where they’d lead you? In The Midnight Library, Nora Seed has the chance to make things right after a life of misery and suffering. She re-lives what she considers some of her biggest regrets and wonders about which played the biggest role in the outcome that is her current life.

“Every second of every day we are entering a new universe. And we spend so much time wishing our lives were different, comparing ourselves to other people and to other versions of ourselves, when really most lives contain degrees of good and degrees of bad.”

Matt Haig, The Midnight Library

This book provided a great perspective on how we see life, the choices we make, and those pesky little things we call regrets. I could not put down this book until I finished the story. And in the end, it brought me tears and gave me comfort and joy at the same time.
The book tackles the hard topics of depression and suicide (which could trigger some readers), but it’s overall an incredibly uplifting story—a fantastic way to finish my year in books. Oh, and this one was the winner of the Goodreads Choice Awards for Best Fiction!

“It is easy to mourn the lives we aren’t living. Easy to wish we’d developed other other talents, said yes to different offers. (…) But it is not lives we regret not living that are the real problem. It is the regret itself. It’s the regret that makes us shrivel and wither and feel like our own and other people’s worst enemy.”

Matt Haig, The Midnight Library

I could not put down this book until I finished the story. I think I read this in record time, particularly considering the subject matter (I’m the type of person who would go through a murder mystery at this speed, but not about a subject like this). The Midnight Library holds the distinction of being the first book that brought me to tears. And in the end, it also gave me comfort and great joy. The book tackles the hard topics of depression and suicide (which could trigger some readers), but overall, it’s an incredibly uplifting story—a fantastic way to finish my year in books. 

The only way to learn is to live

Matt Haig, The Midnight Library

I can wholeheartedly recommend this book, and I’m glad to report, I’m not the only one who can say so. The Midnight Library was the winner of the Goodreads Choice Awards for Best Fiction!

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